The NexGen Cloud Computing Conference kicked off in San Diego on Thursday with a fair amount of hype and a lot of sales people.  Granted the intent of the conference is for cloud computing vendors to find and NexGen Cloud Conference develop either sales channels, or business development opportunities within the market.

As an engineer, the conference will probably result in a fair amount of frustration, but will at least provide a level of awareness in how an organization’s sales, marketing, and business teams are approaching their vision of a cloud computing product or service delivery.

However, one presentation stood out.  Terry Hedden, from Marketopia, made some very good points.  His presentation was entitled “How to Build a Successful Cloud Practice.”  While the actual presentation is not so important, he made several points, which I’ll refer to as “Heddonisms,” which struck me as important enough, or amusing enough, to record.

Heddonisms for the Cloud Age:

  • Entire software companies are transitioning to SaaS development.  Lose the idea of licensed software – think of subscription software.
  • Integrators and consultants have a really good future – prepare yourself.
  • The younger generation does not attend tech conferences.  Only old people who think they can sell things, get new jobs, or are trying to put some knowledge to the junk they are selling (the last couple of points are mine).
  • Companies selling hosted SaaS products and services are going to kill those who still hang out at the premise.
  • If you do not introduce cloud services to your customers. your competitor will introduce cloud to your customers.
  • If you are not aspiring to be a leader in cloud, you are not relevant.
  • There is little reason to go into the IaaS business yourself.  Let the big guys build infrastructure – you can make higher margins selling their stuff.  In general, IaaS companies are really bad sales organizations (also mine…).
  • Budgets for security at companies like Microsoft are much higher than for smaller companies.  Thus, it is likely Microsoft’s ability to design, deploy, monitor, and manage secure infrastructure is much higher than the average organization.
  • Selling cloud is easy – you are able to relieve your customers of most up front costs (like buying hardware, constructing data centers, etc.).
  • If you simply direct your customer to Microsoft or Google’s website for a solution, then you are adding no value to our customer.
  • If you hear the word “APP” come up in a conversation, just turn around and run away.
  • If you assist a company in a large SaaS implementation (successfully), they will likely be your customer for life.
  • Don’t do free work or consulting – never (this really hurt me to hear – guilty as charged…).
  • Customers have one concern, and one concern only – Peace of Mind.  Make their pains go away, and you will be successful.  Don’t give them more problems.
  • Customers don’t care what is behind the curtain (such as what kind of computers or routers you are using).  They only care about you taking the pain of stuff that doesn’t make them money away from their lives.
  • Don’t try to sell to IT guys and engineers.  Never.  Never. Never.
  • The best time to work with a company is when they are planning for their technology refresh cycles.

Heddon was great.  While he may have a bit of contempt for engineers (I have thick skin, I can live with the wounds), he provided a very logical and realistic view of how to approach selling and deploying cloud computing.

Now about missing the point.  Perhaps the biggest shortfall of the conference, in my opinion, is that most presentations and even vendor efforts solved only single silos of issues.  Nobody provided an integrated viewpoint of how cloud computing is actually just one tool an organization can use within a larger, planned, architecture.

No doubt I have become bigoted myself after several years of plodding through TOGAF, ITIL, COBIT, Risk Assessments, and many other formal IT-supporting frameworks.  Maybe a career in the military forced me into systems thinking and structured problem solving.  Maybe I lack a higher level of innovative thinking or creativity – but I crave a structured, holistic approach to IT.

Sadly, I got no joy at the NexGen Cloud Computing Conference.  But, I would have driven from LA to San Diego just for Heddon’s presentation and training session – that made the cost of conference and time a valuable investment.

In 2009 we began consulting jobs with governments in developing countries with the primary objective to consolidate data centers across government ministries and agencies into centralized, high capacity and quality data centers.  At the time, nearly all individual ministry or agency data infrastructure was built into either small computers rooms or server closets with some added “brute force” air conditioning, no backup generators, no data back up, superficial security, and lots of other ailments.

CC-SOA The vision and strategy was that if we consolidated inefficient, end of life, and high risk IT infrastructure into a standardized and professionally managed facility, national information infrastructure would not only be more secure, but through standardization, volume purchasing agreements, some server virtualization, and development of broadband infrastructure most of the IT needs of government would be easily fulfilled.

Then of course cloud computing began to mature, and the underlying technologies of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) became feasible.  Now, not only were the governments able to decommission inefficient and high-risk IS environments, they would also be able to build virtual data centers  with levels of on-demand compute, storage, and network resources.  Basic data center replacement.

Even those remaining committed “server hugger” IT managers and fiercely independent governmental organizations cloud hardly argue the benefits of having access to disaster recovery storage capacity though the centralized data center.

As the years passed, and we entered 2014, not only did cloud computing mature as a business model, but senior management began to increase their awareness of various aspects of cloud computing, including the financial benefits, standardization of IT resources, the characteristics of cloud computing, and potential for Platform and Software as a Service (PaaS/SaaS) to improve both business agility and internal decision support systems.

At the same time, information and organizational architecture, governance, and service delivery frameworks such as TOGAF, COBIT, ITIL, and Risk Analysis training reinforced the value of both data and information within an organization, and the need for IT systems to support higher level architectures supporting decision support systems and market interactions (including Government to Government, Business, and Citizens for the public sector) .

2015 will bring cloud computing and architecture together at levels just becoming comprehensible to much of the business and IT world.  The open Group has a good first stab at building a standard for this marriage with their Service-Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure (SOCCI). According to the SOCCI standard,

“Infrastructure is a foundational element for enterprise architecture. Infrastructure has been  traditionally provisioned in a physical manner. With the evolution of virtualization technologies  and application of service-orientation to infrastructure, it can now be offered as a service.

Service-orientation principles originated in the business and application architecture arena. After  repeated, successful application of these principles to application architecture, IT has evolved to  extending these principles to the infrastructure.”

At first glance the SOCII standard appears to be a document which creates a mapping between enterprise architecture (TOGAF) and cloud computing.  At second glance the SOCCI standard really steps towards tightening the loose coupling of standard service-oriented architectures through use of cloud computing tools included with all service models (IaaS/PaaS/SaaS).

The result is an architectural vision which is easily capable of absorbing existing IT requirements, as well as incorporating emerging big data analytics models, interoperability, and enterprise architecture.

Since the early days of 2009 discussion topics with government and enterprise customers have shown a marked transition from simply justifying decommissioning of high risk data centers to how to manage data sharing, interoperability, or the potential for over standardization and other service delivery barriers which might inhibit innovation – or ability of business units to quickly respond to rapidly changing market opportunities.

2015 will be an exciting year for information and communications technologies.  For those of us in the consulting and training business, the new year is already shaping up to be the busiest we have seen.

Now that We Have Adopted IaaS…

On November 25, 2014, in Internet and Telecom, by Administrator

Providing guidance or consulting to organizations on cloud computing topics can be really easy, or really tough.  In the past most of the initial engagement was dedicated to training and building awareness with your customer.  The next step was finding a high value, low risk application or service that could be moved to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to solve an immediate problem, normally associated with disaster recovery or data backups.

Service Buss and DSS As the years have continued, dynamics changed.  On one hand, IT professionals and CIOs began to establish better knowledge of what virtualization, cloud computing, and outsourcing could do for their organization.  CFOs became aware of the financial potential of virtualization and cloud computing, and a healthy dialog between IT, operations, business units, and the CFO.

The “Internet Age” has also driven global competition down to the local level, forcing nearly all organizations to respond more rapidly to business opportunities.  If a business unit cannot rapidly respond to the opportunity, which may require product and service development, the opportunity can be lost far more quickly than in the past.

In the old days, procurement of IT resources could require a fairly lengthy cycle.  In the Internet Age, if an IT procurement cycle takes > 6 months, there is probably little chance to effectively meet the greatly shortened development cycle competitors in other continents – or across the street may be able to fulfill.

With IaaS the procurement cycle of IT resources can be within minutes, allowing business units to spend far more time developing products, services, and solutions, rather than dealing with the frustration of being powerless to respond to short window opportunities.  This is of course addressing the essential cloud characteristics of Rapid Elasticity and On-Demand Self-Service.

In addition to on-demand and elastic resources, IaaS has offered nearly all organizations the option of moving IT resources into either public or private cloud infrastructure.  This has the benefit of allowing data center decommissioning, and re-commissioning into a virtual environment.  The cost of operating data centers, maintaining data centers and IT equipment, and staffing data centers vs. outsourcing that infrastructure into a cloud is very interesting to CFOs, and a major justification for replacing physical data centers with virtual data centers.

The second dynamic, in addition to greater professional knowledge and awareness of cloud computing, is the fact we are starting to recruit cloud-aware employees graduating from universities and making their first steps into careers and workforce.  With these “cloud savvy” young people comes deep experience with interoperable data, social media, big data, data analytics, and an intellectual separation between access devices and underlying IT infrastructure.

The Next Step in Cloud Evolution

OK, so we all are generally aware of the components of IaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS).  Let’s have a quick review of some standout features supported or enabled by cloud:

  • Increased standardization of applications
  • Increased standardization of data bases
  • Federation of security systems (Authentication and Authorization)
  • Service busses
  • Development of other common applications (GIS, collaboration, etc.)
  • Transparency of underlying hardware

Now let’s consider the need for better, real-time, accurate decision support systems (DSS).  Within any organization the value of a DSS is dependent on data integrity, data access (open data within/without an organization), and single-source data.

Frameworks for developing an effective DSS are certainly available, whether it is TOGAF, the US Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF), interoperability frameworks, and service-oriented architectures (SOA).  All are fully compatible with the tools made available within the basic cloud service delivery models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS).

The Open Group (same organization which developed TOGAF) has responded with their model of a Cloud Computing Service Oriented Infrastructure (SOCCI) Framework.  The SOCCI is identified as the marriage of a Service-Oriented Infrastructure and cloud computing.  The SOCCI also incorporates aspects of TOGAF into the framework, which may drive more credibility into a SOCCI architectural development process.

The expected result of this effort is for existing organizations dealing with departmental “silos” of IT infrastructure, data, and applications, a level of interoperability and DSS development based on service-orientation, using a well-designed underlying cloud infrastructure.  This data sharing can be extended beyond the (virtual) firewall to others in an organization’s trading or governmental community, resulting in  DSS which will become closer and closer to an architecture vision based on the true value of data produced, or made available to an organization.

While we most certainly need IaaS, and the value of moving to virtual data centers is justified by itself, we will not truly benefit from the potential of cloud computing until we understand the potential of data produced and available to decision makers.

The opportunity will need a broad spectrum of contributors and participants with awareness and training in disciplines ranging from technical capabilities, to enterprise architecture, to service delivery, and governance acceptable to a cloud-enabled IT world.

For those who are eagerly consuming training and knowledge in the above skills and knowledge, the future is anything but cloudy.  For those who believe in status quo, let’s hope you are close to pension and retirement, as this is your future.

 

Now that We Have Adopted IaaS…

On November 25, 2014, in Internet and Telecom, by Administrator

Providing guidance or consulting to organizations on cloud computing topics can be really easy, or really tough.  In the past most of the initial engagement was dedicated to training and building awareness with your customer.  The next step was finding a high value, low risk application or service that could be moved to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to solve an immediate problem, normally associated with disaster recovery or data backups.

Service Buss and DSS As the years have continued, dynamics changed.  On one hand, IT professionals and CIOs began to establish better knowledge of what virtualization, cloud computing, and outsourcing could do for their organization.  CFOs became aware of the financial potential of virtualization and cloud computing, and a healthy dialog between IT, operations, business units, and the CFO.

The “Internet Age” has also driven global competition down to the local level, forcing nearly all organizations to respond more rapidly to business opportunities.  If a business unit cannot rapidly respond to the opportunity, which may require product and service development, the opportunity can be lost far more quickly than in the past.

In the old days, procurement of IT resources could require a fairly lengthy cycle.  In the Internet Age, if an IT procurement cycle takes > 6 months, there is probably little chance to effectively meet the greatly shortened development cycle competitors in other continents – or across the street may be able to fulfill.

With IaaS the procurement cycle of IT resources can be within minutes, allowing business units to spend far more time developing products, services, and solutions, rather than dealing with the frustration of being powerless to respond to short window opportunities.  This is of course addressing the essential cloud characteristics of Rapid Elasticity and On-Demand Self-Service.

In addition to on-demand and elastic resources, IaaS has offered nearly all organizations the option of moving IT resources into either public or private cloud infrastructure.  This has the benefit of allowing data center decommissioning, and re-commissioning into a virtual environment.  The cost of operating data centers, maintaining data centers and IT equipment, and staffing data centers vs. outsourcing that infrastructure into a cloud is very interesting to CFOs, and a major justification for replacing physical data centers with virtual data centers.

The second dynamic, in addition to greater professional knowledge and awareness of cloud computing, is the fact we are starting to recruit cloud-aware employees graduating from universities and making their first steps into careers and workforce.  With these “cloud savvy” young people comes deep experience with interoperable data, social media, big data, data analytics, and an intellectual separation between access devices and underlying IT infrastructure.

The Next Step in Cloud Evolution

OK, so we all are generally aware of the components of IaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS).  Let’s have a quick review of some standout features supported or enabled by cloud:

  • Increased standardization of applications
  • Increased standardization of data bases
  • Federation of security systems (Authentication and Authorization)
  • Service busses
  • Development of other common applications (GIS, collaboration, etc.)
  • Transparency of underlying hardware

Now let’s consider the need for better, real-time, accurate decision support systems (DSS).  Within any organization the value of a DSS is dependent on data integrity, data access (open data within/without an organization), and single-source data.

Frameworks for developing an effective DSS are certainly available, whether it is TOGAF, the US Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF), interoperability frameworks, and service-oriented architectures (SOA).  All are fully compatible with the tools made available within the basic cloud service delivery models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS).

The Open Group (same organization which developed TOGAF) has responded with their model of a Cloud Computing Service Oriented Infrastructure (SOCCI) Framework.  The SOCCI is identified as the marriage of a Service-Oriented Infrastructure and cloud computing.  The SOCCI also incorporates aspects of TOGAF into the framework, which may drive more credibility into a SOCCI architectural development process.

The expected result of this effort is for existing organizations dealing with departmental “silos” of IT infrastructure, data, and applications, a level of interoperability and DSS development based on service-orientation, using a well-designed underlying cloud infrastructure.  This data sharing can be extended beyond the (virtual) firewall to others in an organization’s trading or governmental community, resulting in  DSS which will become closer and closer to an architecture vision based on the true value of data produced, or made available to an organization.

While we most certainly need IaaS, and the value of moving to virtual data centers is justified by itself, we will not truly benefit from the potential of cloud computing until we understand the potential of data produced and available to decision makers.

The opportunity will need a broad spectrum of contributors and participants with awareness and training in disciplines ranging from technical capabilities, to enterprise architecture, to service delivery, and governance acceptable to a cloud-enabled IT world.

For those who are eagerly consuming training and knowledge in the above skills and knowledge, the future is anything but cloudy.  For those who believe in status quo, let’s hope you are close to pension and retirement, as this is your future.

 

Now that We Have Adopted IaaS…

On November 25, 2014, in Internet and Telecom, by Administrator

Providing guidance or consulting to organizations on cloud computing topics can be really easy, or really tough.  In the past most of the initial engagement was dedicated to training and building awareness with your customer.  The next step was finding a high value, low risk application or service that could be moved to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to solve an immediate problem, normally associated with disaster recovery or data backups.

Service Buss and DSS As the years have continued, dynamics changed.  On one hand, IT professionals and CIOs began to establish better knowledge of what virtualization, cloud computing, and outsourcing could do for their organization.  CFOs became aware of the financial potential of virtualization and cloud computing, and a healthy dialog between IT, operations, business units, and the CFO.

The “Internet Age” has also driven global competition down to the local level, forcing nearly all organizations to respond more rapidly to business opportunities.  If a business unit cannot rapidly respond to the opportunity, which may require product and service development, the opportunity can be lost far more quickly than in the past.

In the old days, procurement of IT resources could require a fairly lengthy cycle.  In the Internet Age, if an IT procurement cycle takes > 6 months, there is probably little chance to effectively meet the greatly shortened development cycle competitors in other continents – or across the street may be able to fulfill.

With IaaS the procurement cycle of IT resources can be within minutes, allowing business units to spend far more time developing products, services, and solutions, rather than dealing with the frustration of being powerless to respond to short window opportunities.  This is of course addressing the essential cloud characteristics of Rapid Elasticity and On-Demand Self-Service.

In addition to on-demand and elastic resources, IaaS has offered nearly all organizations the option of moving IT resources into either public or private cloud infrastructure.  This has the benefit of allowing data center decommissioning, and re-commissioning into a virtual environment.  The cost of operating data centers, maintaining data centers and IT equipment, and staffing data centers vs. outsourcing that infrastructure into a cloud is very interesting to CFOs, and a major justification for replacing physical data centers with virtual data centers.

The second dynamic, in addition to greater professional knowledge and awareness of cloud computing, is the fact we are starting to recruit cloud-aware employees graduating from universities and making their first steps into careers and workforce.  With these “cloud savvy” young people comes deep experience with interoperable data, social media, big data, data analytics, and an intellectual separation between access devices and underlying IT infrastructure.

The Next Step in Cloud Evolution

OK, so we all are generally aware of the components of IaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS).  Let’s have a quick review of some standout features supported or enabled by cloud:

  • Increased standardization of applications
  • Increased standardization of data bases
  • Federation of security systems (Authentication and Authorization)
  • Service busses
  • Development of other common applications (GIS, collaboration, etc.)
  • Transparency of underlying hardware

Now let’s consider the need for better, real-time, accurate decision support systems (DSS).  Within any organization the value of a DSS is dependent on data integrity, data access (open data within/without an organization), and single-source data.

Frameworks for developing an effective DSS are certainly available, whether it is TOGAF, the US Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework (FEAF), interoperability frameworks, and service-oriented architectures (SOA).  All are fully compatible with the tools made available within the basic cloud service delivery models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS).

The Open Group (same organization which developed TOGAF) has responded with their model of a Cloud Computing Service Oriented Infrastructure (SOCCI) Framework.  The SOCCI is identified as the marriage of a Service-Oriented Infrastructure and cloud computing.  The SOCCI also incorporates aspects of TOGAF into the framework, which may drive more credibility into a SOCCI architectural development process.

The expected result of this effort is for existing organizations dealing with departmental “silos” of IT infrastructure, data, and applications, a level of interoperability and DSS development based on service-orientation, using a well-designed underlying cloud infrastructure.  This data sharing can be extended beyond the (virtual) firewall to others in an organization’s trading or governmental community, resulting in  DSS which will become closer and closer to an architecture vision based on the true value of data produced, or made available to an organization.

While we most certainly need IaaS, and the value of moving to virtual data centers is justified by itself, we will not truly benefit from the potential of cloud computing until we understand the potential of data produced and available to decision makers.

The opportunity will need a broad spectrum of contributors and participants with awareness and training in disciplines ranging from technical capabilities, to enterprise architecture, to service delivery, and governance acceptable to a cloud-enabled IT world.

For those who are eagerly consuming training and knowledge in the above skills and knowledge, the future is anything but cloudy.  For those who believe in status quo, let’s hope you are close to pension and retirement, as this is your future.

 

Wiring the Sierras

On November 20, 2014, in Burbank, Internet and Telecom, net neutrality, by Administrator

Inyo County, the second largest county in California, is ready to jumpstart the process of delivering a true broad band infrastructure to business and residences within the Owens Valley.  The plan, called the 21st Century Obsidian Project, envisions delivering a fiber infrastructure to all residents of Inyo County and other surrounding areas along the Eastern Sierras and parts of Death Valley.

Owens Valley Eastern Sierras According to the project RFP, the project goal is “an operating, economically sustainable,
Open Access, Fiber-to-the-Premise, gigabit network serving the Owens Valley and select
neighboring communities. The project is driven by the expectation that Inyo County’s
economy will improve as a result of successfully attaining the goal.”

Many cities are finding ways to bypass the nonsense surrounding discussion on “Net Neutrality.”  Rather than worry about what Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, or other carriers and ISPs feuding over the rights and responsibilities of delivering Internet content to the premise,  many governments understand the need for high speed broadband as a critical economic, social, and academic tool, and are developing alternatives to traditional carriers.

Whether it is the Inyo County project, Burbank One (a product of Burbank Water and Power), Glendale Fiber Optic Solutions (Glendale Water and Power), Pasadena’s City Fiber Services, or Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s (LADWP) Fiber Optic Enterprise, the fiber utility is becoming available in spite of carrier reluctance to develop fiber infrastructure.

Much of the infrastructure is being built to support intelligent grids (power metering and control), and city schools or emergency services – with the awareness fiber optics are fiber optics, and the incremental cost of adding additional fiber cores to each distribution route is low.  So why not build it out for the citizens and businesses?

The important aspect of municipal or city infrastructure development is the acknowledgement this is a utility.  While some government agencies will provide “lit” services, in general the product is “dark” fiber, available for lease or use by commercial service providers.  Many city networks are interconnected (such as in Los Angeles County utility fiber from Glendale, Burbank, and LADWP), as well as having a presence at major network interconnection points.  This allows fiber networks to carry signal to locations such as One Wilshire’s meet-me-room, with additional access to major Internet Exchange Points and direct interconnections allowing further bypass and peering to other national and global service providers.

In the case of Inyo County, planners fully understand they do not have the expertise necessary to become a telecommunications carrier, and plan to outsource maintenance and some operations of the 21st century Obsidian Project to a third party commercial operator – of course within the guidelines established by the RFP.  The intent is to make it easy and cost effective for all businesses, public facilities, schools, and residences to take advantage and exploit broadband infrastructure.

However the fiber will be considered a utility, with no prejudice or limitations given to commercial service providers desiring to take advantage of the infrastructure and deliver services to the county.

We hope more communities will look at innovative visions such as being published by Inyo County, and consider investing in fiber optics as a utility, diluting the potential impact of carrier sanctions against both internet access, content, or applications (including cloud computing Software as a Service subscriptions.  e.g., MS 365, Adobe Creative Cloud, Google Apps, etc.)..

Congratulations to Inyo County for your vision, and best of luck.

Just finished another ICT-related technical assistance visit with a developing country government. Even in mid-2014, I spend a large amount of time teaching basic principles of enterprise architecture, and the need for adding form and structure to ICT strategies.

Service-oriented architectures (SOA) have been around for quite a long time, with some references going back to the 1980s. ITIL, COBIT, TOGAF, and other ICT standards or recommendations have been around for quite a long time as well, with training and certifications part of nearly every professional development program.

So why is the idea of architecting ICT infrastructure still an abstract to so many in government and even private industry? It cannot be the lack of training opportunities, or publicly available reference materials. It cannot be the lack of technology, or the lack of consultants readily willing to assist in deploying EA, SOA, or interoperability within any organization or industry cluster.

During the past two years we have run several Interoperability Readiness Assessments within governments. The assessment initially takes the form of a survey, and is distributed to a sample of 100 or more participants, with positions ranging from administrative task-based workers, to Cxx or senior leaders within ministries and government agencies.

Questions range from basic ICT knowledge to data sharing, security, and decision support systems.

While the idea of information silos is well-documented and understood, it is still quite surprising to see “siloed” attitudes are still prevalent in modern organizations.  Take the following question:

Question on Information Sharing

This question did not refer to sharing data outside of the government, but rather within the government.  It indicates a high lack of trust when interacting with other government agencies, which will of course prevent any chance of developing a SOA or facilitating information sharing among other agencies.  The end result is a lower level of both integrity and value in national decision support capability.

The Impact of Technology and Standardization

Most governments are considering or implementing data center consolidation initiatives.  There are several good reasons for this, including:

  • Cost of real estate, power, staffing, maintenance, and support systems
  • Transition from CAPEX-based ICT infrastructure to OPEX-based
  • Potential for virtualization of server and storage resources
  • Standardized cloud computing resources

While all those justifications for data center consolidation are valid, the value potentially pales in comparison of the potential of more intelligent use of data across organizations, and even externally to outside agencies.  To get to this point, one senior government official stated:

“Government staff are not necessarily the most technically proficient.  This results in reliance on vendors for support, thought leadership, and in some cases contractual commitments.  Formal project management training and certification are typically not part of the capacity building of government employees.

Scientific approaches to project management, especially ones that lend themselves to institutionalization and adoption across different agencies will ensure a more time-bound and intelligent implementation of projects. Subsequently, overall knowledge and technical capabilities are low in government departments and agencies, and when employees do gain technical proficiency they will leave to join private industry.”

There is also an issue with a variety of international organizations going into developing countries or developing economies, and offering no or low cost single-use ICT infrastructure, such as for health-related agencies, which are not compatible with any other government owned or operated applications or data sets.

And of course the more this occurs, the more difficult it is for government organizations to enable interoperability or data sharing, and thus the idea of an architecture or data sharing become either impossible or extremely difficult to implement or accomplish.

The Road to EA, SOAs, and Decision Support

There are several actions to take on the road to meeting our ICT objectives.

  1. Include EA, service delivery (ITIL), governance (COBIT), and SOA training in all university and professional ICT education programs.  It is not all about writing code or configuring switches, we need to ensure a holistic understanding of ICT value in all ICT education, producing a higher level of qualified graduates entering the work force.
  2. Ensure government and private organizations develop or adopt standards or regulations which drive enterprise architecture, information exchange models, and SOAs as a basic requirement of ICT planning and operations.
  3. Ensure executive awareness and support, preferably through a formal position such as the Chief Information Officer (CIO).  Principles developed and published via the CIO must be adopted and governed by all organizations,
    Nobody expects large organizations, in particular government organizations, to change their cultures of information independence overnight.  This is a long term evolution as the world continues to better understand the value and extent of value within existing data sets, and begin creating new categories of data.  Big data, data analytics, and exploitation of both structured and unstructured data will empower those who are prepared, and leave those who are not prepared far behind.
    For a government, not having the ability to access, identify, share, analyze, and address data created across agencies will inhibit effective decision support, with potential impact on disaster response, security, economic growth, and overall national quality of life.
    If there is a call to action in this message, it is for governments to take a close look at how their national ICT policies, strategies, human capacity, and operations are meeting national objectives.  Prioritizing use of EA and supporting frameworks or standards will provide better guidance across government, and all steps taken within the framework will add value to the overall ICT capability.

Pacific-Tier Communications LLC  provides consulting to governments and commercial organizations on topics related to data center consolidation, enterprise architecture, risk management, and cloud computing.

ICT Training Development Survey

On August 4, 2014, in Internet and Telecom, by Administrator

Pacific-Tier Communications LLC is preparing our ICT courseware development plan for 2015.  We would be very grateful if you took a minute and filled out the following linked survey.

We are not collecting any personal or location information – just interested in what your organization would find useful for professional ICT training and courseware.

Thanks for your support!

If you have any questions, please send us a note at info@pacific-tier.com

Tagged with:
 

ACC 2013The 2013 ACC kicked off on Tuesday morning with an acknowledgement by Philippine Long Distance Telecommunications (PLDT) CEO Napolean L. Nazareno that “we’re going through a profound and painful transformation to digital technologies.”  He continued to explain that in addition to making the move to a digital corporate culture and architecture that for traditional telcos to succeed they will need to “master new skills, including new partnership skills.”

That direction drives a line straight down the middle of attendees at the conference.  Surprisingly, many companies attending and advertising their products still focus on “minutes termination,” and traditional voice-centric relationships with other carriers and “voice” wholesalers.

Philippe MilletMatthew Howett, Regulation and Policy Practice Leader for Ovum Research noted ”while fixed and mobile minutes are continuing to grow, traditional voice revenue is on the decline.”  He backed the statement up with figures including “Over the Top/OTT” services, which are when a service provider sends all types of communications, including video, voice, and other connections, over an Internet protocol network – most commonly over the public Internet.

Howett informed the ACC’s plenary session attendees that Ovum Research believes up to US$52 billion will be lost in traditional voice revenues to OTT providers by 2016, and an additional US$32.6 billion to instant messaging providers in the same period.

The message was simple to traditional communications carriers – adapt or become irrelevant.  National carriers may try to work with government regulators to try and adopt legal barriers to prevent the emergence of OTTs operating in that country, however that is only a temporary step to stem the flow of “technology-enabled” competition and retain revenues. 

As noted by Nazareno, the carriers must wake up to the reality we are in a global technology refresh cycle and  business visions, expectations, and construct business plans that will not only allow the company to survive, but also meet the needs of their users and national objectives.

Kevin Vachon, MEFMartin Geddes, owner of Martin Geddes Consulting, introduced the idea of “Task Substitution.’”  Task Substitution occurs when an individual or organization is able to use a substitute technology or process to accomplish tasks that were previously only available from a single source.  One example is the traditional telephone call.  In the past you would dial a number, and the telephone company would go through a series of connections, switches, and processes that would both connect two end devices, as well as provide accounting for the call.

The telephone user now has many alternatives to the tradition phone call – all task substitutions.  You can use Skype, WebEx, GoToMeeting, instant messaging – any one of a multitude of utilities allowing an individual or group to participate in one to one or many to many communications.  When a strong list of alternative methods to complete a task exist, then the original method may become obsolete, or have to rapidly adapt to avoid being discarded by users.

A strong message, which made many attendees visibly uncomfortable.

Ivan Landen, Managing Director at Asia-Pacific Expereo, described the telecom revolution in terms all attendees could easily visualize.  “Today around 80% of the world’s population have access to the electrical grid/s, while more than 85% of the population has access to Wifi.”

Ivan Landen, ExpereoHe also provided an additional bit of information which did not surprise attendees, but also made some of the telecom representatives a bit uneasy.  In a survey Geddes conducted he discovered that more than 1/2 of business executives polled admitted their Internet access was better at their homes than in their offices.”  This information can be analyzed in several different ways, from having poor IT planning with the company, to poor UT capacity management within the communication provider, to the  reality traffic on consumer networks is simply lower during the business day than during other time periods.

However the main message was “there is a huge opportunity for communication companies to fix business communications.”

The conference continues until Friday.  Many more sessions, many more perimeter discussions, and a lot of space for the telecom community to come to grips with the reality “we need to come to grips with the digital world.”

Tagged with:
 

Cloud Computing ClassroomNormally, when we think of technical-related training, images of rooms loaded with switches, routers, and servers might come to mind.    Cloud computing is different.  In reality, cloud computing is not a technology, but rather a framework employing a variety of technologies – most notably virtualization, to solve business problems or enable opportunities.

From our own practice, the majority of cloud training students represent non-technical careers and positions. Our training does follow the CompTIA Cloud Essentials course criterion, and is not a technical course, so the non-technical student trend should not come as any big surprise. 

What does come as a surprise is how enthusiastically our students dig into the topic.  Whether business unit managers, accounting and finance, sales staff, or executives, all students come into class convinced they need to know about cloud computing as an essential part of their future career progression, or even at times to ensure their career survival.

Our local training methodology is based on establishing an indepth knowledge of the NIST Cloud Definitions and Cloud Reference Architecture.  Once the students get beyond a perception such documents are too complex, and that we will refer nearly all aspects of training to both documents, we easily establish a core cloud computing knowledge base needed to explore both technical aspects, and more importantly practical aspects of how cloud computing is used in our daily lives, and likely future lives.

This is not significantly different than when we trained business users on how to use, employ, and exploit  the Internet in the 90s.  Those of us in engineering or technical operations roles viewed this type of training with either amusement or contempt, at times mocking those who did not share our knowledge and experience of internetworking, and ability to navigate the Internet universe.

We are in the same phase of absorbing and developing tacit knowledge of compute and storage access on demand, service-oriented architectures, Software as a Service, the move to a subscription-based application world.

Hamster Food as a Service (HFaaS)Those students who attend cloud computing training leave the class better able to engage in decision-making related to both personal and organizational information and communication technology, and less exposed to the spectrum of cloud washing, or marketing use of “cloud” and “XXX as a Service”  language overwhelming nearly all media on subjects ranging from hamster food to SpaceX and hyper loops.

Even the hardest core engineers who have degraded themselves to join a non-technical business-oriented cloud course walk away with a better view on how their tools support organizational agility (good jargon, no?), in addition to the potential financial impacts, reduced application development cycles, disaster recovery, business continuity, and all the other potential benefits to the organization when adopting cloud computing.

Some even walk away from the course planning a breakup with some of their favorite physical servers.

The Bottom Line

No student has walked away from a cloud computing course knowing less about the role, impact, and potential of implementing cloud in nearly any organization.  While the first few hours of class embrace a lot of great debates on the value of cloud computing, by the end of the course most students agree they are better prepared to consider, envision, evaluate, and address the potential or shortfalls of cloud computing.

Cloud computing is, and will continue to have influence on many aspects of our lives. It is not going away anytime soon.  The more we can learn, either through self-study or resident training, the better position we’ll be in to make intelligent decisions regarding the use and value of cloud in our lives and organizations.